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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorEglash, Ron, 1958-
dc.contributorKrishnamoorthy, M. S.
dc.contributorAdali, Sibel
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:09:53Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:09:53Z
dc.date.created2014-09-11T10:37:56Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1114
dc.descriptionMay 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Science
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the demands that these cultural simulations put upon the software. Intuitively it is assumed that the math and computing for Native American designs would have to be the same as that of African designs, but simulations help show that there are many conventions in formal systems, and thus keeping true to cultural differences sometimes requires different conventions. These differences were particularly well illuminated by my attempt to create a new CSDT, "Animator," which incorporates multiple cultural practices. The Animator approach makes use of cultural variation as a kind of "scaffolding" in which users gain increasing knowledge and skill with the software, moving from culturally specific applications to broader use. With each "step," the user is given more and more freedom. By the end, the user can create anything they want, but by going through this process, I hypothesized that they would be more at ease with the mathematics and computing ideas they learned at the beginning, and more likely to continue to incorporate culturally creative materials rather than simply replicating video games and other commercial media as is often seen in similar environments such as MIT's Scratch.
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes the latest phase in the on-going development of the educational software known as Culturally Situated Design Tools (CSDTs). CSDTs are based on the idea that many cultural design--native beadwork, urban graffiti, and cornrow hairstyles, for example--include math and computing ideas in their creation. But these math and computing ideas are too "embedded" to see them directly. By simulating these patterns, those embedded ideas are brought to the surface. Thus the tools are primarily directed towards low-income, underrepresented youth: to help them see that they have "ownership" over math and computing ideas, and dispel myths of genetic or cultural determinism.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectComputer science
dc.titleCultural diversity as computational diversity : software development for ethnocomputing
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid172684
dc.digitool.pid172685
dc.digitool.pid172686
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Computer Science


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