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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorSymans, Michael D.
dc.contributorO'Rourke, Michael J.
dc.contributorRosowsky, David V.
dc.contributorvan de Lindt, John W.
dc.contributor.authorTian, Jingjing
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:12:19Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:12:19Z
dc.date.created2014-09-11T11:37:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1156
dc.descriptionMay 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractLow-rise woodframe buildings with disproportionately flexible ground stories represent a significant percentage of the building stock in seismically vulnerable communities in the Western United States. These structures have a readily identifiable structural weakness at the ground level due to an asymmetric distribution of large openings in the perimeter wall lines and to a lack of interior partition walls, resulting in a soft story condition that makes the structure highly susceptible to severe damage or collapse under design-level earthquakes. The conventional approach to retrofitting such structures is to increase the ground story stiffness. An alternate approach is to increase the energy dissipation capacity of the structure via the incorporation of supplemental energy dissipation devices (dampers), thereby relieving the energy dissipation demands on the framing system. Such a retrofit approach is consistent with a Performance-Based Seismic Retrofit (PBSR) philosophy through which multiple performance levels may be targeted. The effectiveness of such a retrofit is presented via examination of the seismic response of a full-scale four-story building that was tested on the outdoor shake table at NEES-UCSD and a full-scale three-story building that was tested using slow pseudo-dynamic hybrid testing at NEES-UB. In addition, a Direct Displacement Design (DDD) methodology was developed as an improvement over current DDD methods by considering torsion, with or without the implementation of damping devices, in an attempt to avoid the computational expense of nonlinear time-history analysis (NLTHA) and thus facilitating widespread application of PBSR in engineering practice.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectCivil engineering
dc.titlePerformance-based seismic retrofit of soft-story woodframe buildings using energy-dissipation systems
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid172812
dc.digitool.pid172813
dc.digitool.pid172814
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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