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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorVollen, Jason
dc.contributorMistur, Mark S.
dc.contributorPerry, Chris (Christopher S.)
dc.contributorHarrison, Shay
dc.contributorDyson, Anna H.
dc.contributor.authorWinn, Kelly Raymond
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:13:56Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:13:56Z
dc.date.created2014-10-08T11:16:14Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1199
dc.descriptionAugust 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Architecture
dc.description.abstractIn this investigation, a design decision framework is developed linking local climate to device morphology using computational design tools in order to develop optimized geometry by balancing criteria based on initial design constrains, ranges of viable performance values, and material and technological limitations.
dc.description.abstractThrough novel computational strategies for the development of variable geometries and complex surfacing set up for digital fabrication, an environmentally tuned ceramic envelope is used as a working example of a next generation building system. The modeling, simulation, and analysis of a variable response to a dynamic environmental condition are explored as a case study. By building a parametric framework for the design of climate specific envelope systems, a methodology for the integration of emerging environmentally responsive envelope systems is conceived in order to build upon existing data sets and generate knowledge iteratively. Rather than relying on packaged software platforms, closed models or singular analytical studies, this research explores a flexible methodology for the development of open-ended parametric models that can adapt to meet emerging challenges for design, introduce new model inputs, or integrate emerging toolsets interchangeably. By providing a versatile framework for design, multidimensional complexity is reintroduced into the architectural context in order to actively respond to dynamic natural systems sympathetically.
dc.description.abstractThe tendency in modern building design towards full glass facades detracts from much of the energy efficiency advancements made in modern construction. As a result, further reductions in building energy use hinge on the need for a renewed interest in opaque facades in the building industry. The High-performance Masonry System (HpMS) as outlined by "Energy exchange building envelope" (Jason Vollen 2013) is the base case for this research, implementing energy exchange at the architectural envelope by harnessing bioclimatic energy flows through a modular ceramic masonry system to achieve a higher thermal performance. The system applies multi-scalar strategies of color, texture, and morphology that tune façade performance in response to the dynamic variability of local climatic conditions. HpMS seeks to achieve a built ecology of variable performance based on controlled topology and surface articulation rather than linear heat transfer through a uniform surface. Borrowing principles of bioanalytics, energy flows through the building enclosure are harnessed to offload excess thermal loads, and passively heat or cool internal load dominated structures. By conceiving the architectural envelope as a transition to the exterior environment rather than a sealed barrier, strategies tuned to respond to local conditions modulate exterior environment to meet interior demands. This research seeks to bridge the cultural and technological rifts of outdated building practices and accepted social norms by integrating new technologies in a geometrically complex, modular wall system with components that are easily customized to not only improve façade performance, but provide new possibilities for designers, clients, and users.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectArchitectural science
dc.titleInter-scalar multivariable decision making framework for the architectural envelope
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid173027
dc.digitool.pid173028
dc.digitool.pid173029
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentSchool of Architecture


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