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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorBringsjord, Selmer
dc.contributorCassimatis, Nicholas L. (Nicholas Louis), 1971-
dc.contributorKalsher, Michael J.
dc.contributorSun, Ron, 1960-
dc.contributorLynch, Michael F.
dc.contributor.authorScally, Jonathan Richard
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:15:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:15:21Z
dc.date.created2014-10-08T12:07:13Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1236
dc.descriptionAugust 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractCognitive systems with human-level intelligence must display a wide range of abilities, including reasoning about the beliefs of others, reasoning about past and future versions of themselves, consideration of hypothetical and future situations, and reasoning with uncertainty, counterfactuals, quantified objects, and abstract situations. While each of these deals in some way with reasoning about alternative states of reality, no single knowledge representation framework deals with them in a unified, general, and scalable manner. As a consequence it is difficult to build cognitive systems for domains that require each of these abilities to be used together. To enable this integration, this thesis proposes a representational framework based on synchronizing an agent's knowledge between different "worlds". Using this framework, each of these tasks can be reformulated into a reasoning problem involving worlds. This demonstrates that by building upon small set of fundamental principles, cognitive systems can achieve representational parsimony, deep integration, and broad new abilities. The thesis also analyzes a working implementation of the representational framework, built upon the Polyscheme cognitive architecture, and discusses lessons for future worlds-based cognitive architecture development.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectCognitive science
dc.titleWorlds as a unifying element of knowledge representation
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid173136
dc.digitool.pid173139
dc.digitool.pid173137
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Cognitive Science


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