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dc.rights.licenseUsers may download and share copies with attribution in accordance with a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License. No commercial use or derivatives are permitted without the explicit approval of the author.
dc.contributorWinner, Langdon
dc.contributorAkera, Atsushi
dc.contributorNieusma, Dean
dc.contributorRiley, Donna
dc.contributor.authorTang, Xiaofeng
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:16:52Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:16:52Z
dc.date.created2015-03-09T09:48:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1255
dc.descriptionDecember 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractEducators have recommended the integration of engineering and the liberal arts as a promising educational model to prepare young engineers for global economic, environmental, sociotechnical, and ethical challenges. Drawing upon philosophy of technology, engineering studies, and educational psychology, this dissertation examines diverse visions and strategies for integrating engineering and liberal education and explores their impacts on students' intellectual and moral development. Based on archival research, interviews, and participant observation, the dissertation presents in-depth case studies of three educational initiatives that seek to blend engineering with the humanities, social sciences, and arts: Harvey Mudd College, the Picker Engineering Program at Smith College, and the Programs in Design and Innovation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The research finds that learning engineering in a liberal arts context increases students' sense of "owning" their education and contributes to their communication, teamwork, and other non-technical professional skills. In addition, opportunities for extensive liberal arts learning in the three cases encourage some students to pursue alternative, less technocentric approaches to engineering. Nevertheless, the case studies suggest that the epistemological differences between the engineering and liberal arts instructors help maintain a technical/social dualism among most students. Furthermore, the dissertation argues a "hidden curriculum," which reinforces the dominant ideology in the engineering profession, persists in the integrated programs and prevents the students from reflecting on the broad social context of engineering and critically examining the assumptions upheld in the engineering profession.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectScience and technology studies
dc.titleEngineering knowledge and student development : an institutional and pedagogical critique of engineering education
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid174637
dc.digitool.pid174638
dc.digitool.pid174639
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Science and Technology Studies


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