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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorHull, Robert, 1959-
dc.contributorLewis, Daniel J.
dc.contributorGall, Daniel
dc.contributorMoore, Richard
dc.contributorWang, G.-C. (Gwo-Ching), 1946-
dc.contributor.authorParvaneh, Hamed
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:17:44Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:17:44Z
dc.date.created2015-03-09T10:12:40Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1279
dc.descriptionDecember 2014
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractIn the first stage of the project, a state-of-the-art mass-filtered FIB (MS-FIB) from Orsay Physics has been integrated with a VersaProbe 5000 XPS instrument from ULVAC-PHI. The integration process involved overcoming major mechanical and electrical obstacles and numerous problem-solving situations. The major reason for choosing the VersaProbe was to utilize its analytical concentric hemispherical analyzer (CHA) to measure the kinetic energy of the Auger electrons induced by the ions generated from a gold-silicon liquid alloy source.
dc.description.abstractThis research project is aimed to study the application of ion-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (IAES) in combination with the characteristics of focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy for performing chemical spectroscopy and further evaluate its potential for 3-dimensional chemical tomography applications.
dc.description.abstractSubsequently the acquisition and detection parameters of both MS-FIB and the electron energy analyzer were successfully optimized and IAES of selected elements in third-row of the periodic table, namely Mg, Al, Si, and the ones in the fourth-row, namely Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu acquired using Si++ and Au+ incident ions. As a result of energetic collisions between the incident and target atoms, in addition to plasmon excitations, Auger electrons from both colliding particles were generated and detected. Different components of the electron energy spectra acquired were carefully analyzed and the origin of different features observed identified.
dc.description.abstractIn IAES, however, large excitation cross sections can occur by promotion of in-ner shell electrons through crossing of molecular orbitals. Originally such phenomenological excitation processes were first proposed [3] for bi-particle gas phase collision systems to explain the generation of inner shell vacancies in violent collisions. In addition to excitation of incident or target atoms, due to a much heavier mass of ions compared to electrons, there would also be a substantial momentum transfer from the incident to the target atoms. This may cause the excited target atom to recoil from the lattice site or alternatively sputter off the surface with the possibility of de-excitation while the atom is either in motion in the matrix or traveling in vacuum. As a result, one could expect differences between the spectra induced by incident electrons and ions and interpretation of the IAE spectra requires separate consideration of both excitation and decay processes.
dc.description.abstractThe mechanism for generation of Auger electrons by bombarding ions is very different from its electron induced counterpart. In the conventional electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (EAES), an electron beam with energy typically in the range 1-10kV is used to excite inner-shell (core) electrons of the solid. An electron from a higher electron energy state then de-excites to fill the hole and the extra energy is then transferred to either another electron, i.e. the Auger electron, or generation of an X-ray (photon). In both cases the emitting particles have charac-teristic energies and could be used to identify the excited target atoms.
dc.description.abstractThe resolution of the technique both spatially (x-y) and in depth (z) were also evaluated. For spatial resolution mainly the Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to estimate the area from which the excited target atoms with inner shell vacancies originate. Attention was paid to the relationship between the Auger electron infor-mation depth and the depth-dependency of various energy-loss mechanisms for the incoming ions. In particular, an area from which target atoms with energies higher than a threshold energy sputter off the surface, was concluded to be an estimate for lateral spatial resolution.
dc.description.abstractThen the relative efficiencies of Auger electron generation by ion impact from the above mentioned targets, acquired under the same conditions, were compared with each other and the origin of the differences in line shape were explained. The elements on the third row of periodic table in particular show narrow peaks emanat-ed mainly from the decay of excited atoms. For heavier elements, however, the increase of fluorescence yield by increasing atomic number and smaller lifetime for the inner shell vacancies result in reduction of atomic contribution to the spectrum. The absolute yield of Auger electrons were also evaluated using an indirect method using the ion-induced electron emission yield and, in particular, estimation for Al and Cr, where the values of ion-induced electron emission were available in the literature, was provided.
dc.description.abstractFinally the effects of hardware parameters, in particular the solid angle of the detector and the transmission of the electron energy analyzer, on the collected signal were characterized and used to put together an estimate for the edge length of an information cube representing the minimum amount of material that has to be removed before a meaningful signal can be collected.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMaterials science and engineering
dc.titleA new route to nanoscale tomographic chemical analysis : focused ion beam-induced auger electron spectroscopy
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid174715
dc.digitool.pid174716
dc.digitool.pid174717
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Materials Science and Engineering


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