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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorLee, Daeyong
dc.contributorMessler, Robert W., 1942-
dc.contributor.authorKnapp, Keith N., II
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:20:12Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:20:12Z
dc.date.created2015-04-10T16:18:04Z
dc.date.issued1994-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1360
dc.descriptionAugust 1994
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractThe significance of these findings on the relative effects lies in allowing the designer, or researcher interested in creating new hook models for use by designers, to now have a better understanding of which factors of the geometry and which interactions among these factors have a significant effect on the overall performance of the hook. It is not enough to merely consider the effects of the geometry factors, but one must also consider the interactions among these factors to yield a functional and safe overall design. The results obtained in this research could be used to create a response model for in-plane cantilever hooks with similar geometry. The results may also be extrapolated for use with materials with similar material properties.
dc.description.abstractDesign for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) has revolutionized the way designers think about new designs. The concept of integral attachment, where fastening and attachment strategies have become integral to the design of the part itself, has emerged from DFMA. A key method of integral attachment is the use of cantilever hooks or snaps, whether they be mounted in-plane or out-of-plane. With the increase in use of hooks has come the need for standardization of the attachment strategy and design analysis tools.
dc.description.abstractThe tools available for the analysis of the hooks that are designed as integral features of a part range in complexity from classical beam equations to full blown nonlinear finite element analyses. The first being very simple and inaccurate, while the latter is accurate yet overly complicated and too time consuming to be performed for individual designs.
dc.description.abstractThis research attempts to experimentally characterize the effects of variations in the geometry of one of the more common integral attachment strategies on performance, the in-plane cantilever hook, and compares the findings with a nonlinear finite element analysis using linear elastic material constitutive relations. The performance characteristics for this hook are maximum force and strain during assembly and disassembly.
dc.description.abstractThe results show which main factors for the geometry and higher order interactions among the factors influence the performance of the hook. The means of the response values are also provide and compared to nonlinear finite element solutions. The nonlinear finite element analysis was performed with large strain and rotation models, linear elastic material constitutive model with properties based on experimental stress-strain results, and surface friction elements.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMechanical engineering
dc.titleExperimental characterization of the in-plane cantilever hook
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid174968
dc.digitool.pid174969
dc.digitool.pid174970
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mechanical Engineering


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