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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorMalaviya, B. K.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Paula L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:20:18Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:20:18Z
dc.date.created2015-04-10T16:18:21Z
dc.date.issued1977-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1363
dc.descriptionJune 1977
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstract(5) In regards to safety, with the prospect of the potential release of fission products to the environment, the system will not achieve criticality as a result of an accidental insertion of positive reactivity such as might occur from temperature transients in the fission blanket. Also, a substantial margin apparently will exist against a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) which could lead to fuel meltdown in the fission blanket and consequently alter its subcritical configuration.
dc.description.abstractIn view of the fusion-fission hybrid concept, the joint efforts of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) have produced a conceptual design of a mirror hybrid reactor which will employ the technology of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Fission Reactor (HTGR) in the design of the multiplying blanket. The objective of the design effort is a self-contained, electrical power plant.
dc.description.abstractThe approach in the LLL-PNL hybrid design was decidedly conservative, based largely on presently understood technology rather than an extrapolation to future developments expected in both fission and fusion technology. In this way, it was possible for the laboratories to develop some parameterization for their hybrid concept while, at the same time, take advantage of existing fission and fusion technology. Based on the hypothesis that the fusion plasma can be successfully confined and sustained, the LLL-PNL mirror hybrid reactor currently has the following general characteristics:
dc.description.abstract(1) The system will employ Yin-Yang magnetic confinement for the mirror fusion reactor.
dc.description.abstract(2) The system will breed both fusile fuel (tritium) and fissile fuel (plutonium) in a subcritical, (i.e., neutron balance less than one), fission blanket of modular design using helium gas as a coolant.
dc.description.abstract(3) The utilization of fission energy, in addition to the energy released by controlled thermonuclear reactions, will relax the Lawson criterion required for net power production by an order of magnitude in a D-T plasma from nτ ~ 2 x 10 14 cm-sec to nτ ~ 3.0 x 10 13 cm-3-sec.
dc.description.abstract(4) The system will attain an overall output to input power (energy) ratio appreciably greater than unity.
dc.description.abstractThe 14 MeV kinetic energy of the neutrons released from a controlled D-T fusion plasma is the main mechanism used for converting the fusion energy into an exploitable source of heat. In the fusion-fission hybrid concept, these same 14 MeV neutrons can also be used to produce a multiplication of the fusion neutron source strength and energy if they are allowed to irradiate a heavy, fissionable element, such as uranium, which is distributed in the blanket surrounding the plasma. While a 14 MeV neutron is born for each D-T reaction, a tritium atom is consumed. Therefore, since tritium is neither naturally-occurring or present in large quantities -- the fission blanket would also contain lithium which, thorugh absorption of the secondary neutrons produced by the reactions between the 14 MeV source neutrons and the heavy element, could be converted into replenishable tritium fuel for the plasma. Also, if the heavy element used were uranium-238, there would be the advantage of breeding fissile plutonium while the generation of fission heat would enhance power production.
dc.description.abstractA deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactor, with an estimated output power level of about 1000 MWe, is considered to be a sufficiently rich neutron source capable of driving a fission assembly. A power output ranging from 200 to 2000 MWe is expected from the fission assembly, called the fission blanket, when used with a 1000 MWe fusion reactor operating on the D-T fuel cycle. The inclusion of fissionable material in the blanket, which normally contains lithium for tritium breeding purposes, increases the energy multiplying capability of the blanket from between 1 and 2 to between 10 and 20.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectNuclear engineering
dc.titleA preliminary study of a conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid system based on a mirror fusion reactor with a subcritical helium-cooled fission blanket
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid174977
dc.digitool.pid174978
dc.digitool.pid174979
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Nuclear Engineering


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