Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorVollen, Jason
dc.contributorDyson, Anna H.
dc.contributorAmitay, Michael
dc.contributorLetchford, C. W.
dc.contributorXiang, Ning
dc.contributor.authorMenicovich, David
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:27:44Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:27:44Z
dc.date.created2015-09-17T14:00:54Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1513
dc.descriptionDecember 2013
dc.descriptionSchool of Architecture
dc.description.abstractThe biggest climatic challenge to the design, construction and performance of tall buildings is wind sensitivity. This challenge is further emphasized seeing two market driven trends: on one hand as urban population grows, land value rises while plot sizes decrease; on the other, more cost effective modular construction techniques are introduc-ing much lighter tall building structures. The combination of the two suggests a potential increase in the slenderness ratio of tall buildings (typically less than 6:1 but stretching to 20:1 in the near future) where not-so-tall but much lighter buildings will be the bulk of new construction in densely populated cities, providing affordable housing in the face of fast urbanization but also introducing wind sensitivity which was previously the problem of a very limited number of super tall buildings to a much larger number of buildings and communities.
dc.description.abstractFluidic-based Aerodynamic Modification (FAM) is a fundamentally different approach; instead of adjusting the solid material to improve the aerodynamic `shape' of the structure, fluid-based flow control is used to manipulate the boundary layer charac-teristics. The local flow field is modified to `view' the solid as a different shape, and thus, that solid will experience reduced loads.
dc.description.abstractCurrently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commer-cial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerody-namically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively respond to fluctuating environmental conditions such as changes in wind direction or velocity over the height of building which could be of consequence if the conditions for which the building was designed for change due to, for example, changes in the built environ-ment surrounding it.
dc.description.abstractTo date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendic-ular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Kármán-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habita-bility) design criteria of slender buildings.
dc.description.abstractBy 2050 an estimated 9 billion people will inhabit planet earth and almost all the growth in the next 40 years will be in urban areas putting tremendous pressure on creating sustainable cities.
dc.description.abstractThe rapid increase in population, rise in land value and decrease in plot sizes in cities around the world positions tall or more importantly slender buildings as the best suited building typology to address the increasingly critical demand for space in this pressing urbanization trend. However, the majority of new tall building urban develop-ments have not followed principles of environmental and/or sustainable design and incentives to innovate, both technological and economic, are urgently required.
dc.description.abstractThe proposed research aims to investigate a novel approach to the interaction be-tween tall buildings and their environment. Through this approach the research proposes a new relationship between buildings and the flows around, through and inside them, where buildings could adapt to better control and manage the air flow around them, and consequently produce significant opportunities to reduce material and energy consump-tion profiles of tall building.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.titleBuilding integrated active flow control : improving the aerodynamic performance of tall buildings using fluid-based aerodynamic modification
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid176553
dc.digitool.pid176555
dc.digitool.pid176557
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentSchool of Architecture


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record