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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorLetchford, C. W.
dc.contributorLombardo, Franklin Thomas
dc.contributorO'Rourke, Michael J.
dc.contributorVastola, Kenneth S.
dc.contributor.authorNguyen Sinh, Hung
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:33:05Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:33:05Z
dc.date.created2016-02-26T09:53:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1630
dc.descriptionDecember 2015
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractTwo models will be presented in this work termed: 1) simple model and 2) sophisticated model. For the simple model, the ice thickness was estimated directly from historical events using the actual meteorological variables (precipitation, wind speed, temperature). These ice thickness values were analyzed to fit distributions to simulate for a longer period. The maximum mean wind speeds during these FR events were recorded and also fit to a distribution. Using these fitting distributions, wind speeds and ice thickness were simulated for 10,000 years to assess the joint wind and ice hazards. Then, the joint probability distribution and annual joint probability of exceedence for wind speeds and ice thickness during FR were established to construct joint hazard curves for wind and ice.
dc.description.abstractFinally, some examples were used to demonstrate how to apply these joint hazard curves in design problems. Some discussion about how these applications differ from the current design guidelines ASCE 7 (2010) were also raised. Noting that ASCE 7 (2010) uses the different load factors for primary load and companion load when dealing with two (or more) coincident hazards. Also, it is assumed that the maximum combination of two loads will be the maximum of the primary load plus the typical of the companion one. The typical load (companion load) is the load that combines with another maximal load (primary load) to give a total structural reliability index of 3.0. While in this research, the joint probability distribution of two hazards is used directly to find the maximum load combination.
dc.description.abstractFor the sophisticated model, first, multivariate simulation (wind, temperature and precipitation) for many years in the Midwestern US are undertaken. By setting the conditions for freezing rain, these variables were then input into a simple ice-accretion model to estimate ice thickness during FR events. Again joint probability distribution and annual joint probability of exceedence for wind speeds and ice thickness during FR were established to construct joint hazard curves for wind and ice. Additionally, the joint hazard of wind and snow (ground snow load) is also established by setting a condition for snow formation instead of ice. These joint hazard curves were then compared to the existing prescribed treatments of these two hazards in design loading guidelines, such as ASCE 7 (2010) (and/or NESC (2007)) in the United States. Since all the meteorological variables (temperature, wind speed and precipitation) were simulated in the sophisticated model, it is possible to input climate change scenarios into this model to investigate the potential impact of the climate change on such joint hazards.
dc.description.abstractReliability-based design of infrastructure requires the probabilistic assessment of jointly occurring natural hazards. As infrastructure design practices evolve, it is important that this evolution considers multiple hazards. For example, wind and storm surge in a hurricane, an earthquake generating a tsunami or wildfires exacerbated by strong winds and high temperatures. These jointly occurring hazards in some cases can be more devastating than the single hazard. For some locations in the US, wind and ice (e.g., Freezing Rain (FR)) are hazards whose properties are of interest for design of transmission lines and other energy infrastructure (e.g., wind turbines) while for other locations wind and snow load can lead to structural failures. This study will discuss joint wind and ice/snow hazards for Midwestern US.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectCivil engineering
dc.titleMean hourly wind speed, temperature and precipitation simulation with application to assess multi-variable hazards
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177099
dc.digitool.pid177100
dc.digitool.pid177101
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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