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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorXu, Xie George
dc.contributorJi, Wei
dc.contributorLiu, Li (Emily)
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:35:37Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:35:37Z
dc.date.created2016-06-13T11:16:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1672
dc.descriptionMay 2016
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractThis thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome.
dc.description.abstractIn the comparison for increased BMI (done only in VirtualDose), results show that with all other parameters fixed, the organ dose goes down as BMI increases, which is due to the increase in adipose tissue and bulk of the patient model. The range of results when comparing all the three softwares have a wide range, in some cases greater than 150 %, it is evident that using a different anatomical basis for the human phantom and the theoretical basis for the dose estimation will cause fluctuation in the results. Therefore, choosing the software with the most accurate human phantom will provide a closer range to the true dose to the organ.
dc.description.abstractThe results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m^2 to 45 kg/m^2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 \% to 65 \% across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT-Expo for organ dose difference versus age, male phantoms show percent difference of -19 % to 25 % for various organs minus bone surface and breast tissues results. Finally, for organ dose difference across all software for average adult phantom the results range from -45 % to 6 % in the comparison of ImPACT CT to VirtualDose and -27 % to 66 % for the comparison of CT-Expo to VirtualDose.
dc.description.abstractX-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectNuclear engineering
dc.titleAnalysis of patient ct dose data using VirtualDose
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177253
dc.digitool.pid177254
dc.digitool.pid177255
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering


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