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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorCutler, Barbara M.
dc.contributorStewart, Charles V.
dc.contributorFranklin, W. Randolph
dc.contributor.authorEspinoza, Max
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:35:39Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:35:39Z
dc.date.created2016-06-13T11:16:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1673
dc.descriptionMay 2016
dc.descriptionSchool of Science
dc.description.abstractI present a novel online sketching interface for simulations (OASIS) that is easily available to non-experts, providing them with the ability to generate 3D models for daylight simulation from 2D architectural sketches. This online sketching interface allows users to both quickly create 3D models and perform qualitative daylight analysis. Moreover, I conduct a pilot user study where I hypothesize that if OASIS is publicized to users online, then anonymous online users will construct models in our sketching interface and create daylight renderings for analysis. Feedback from anonymous online users that constructed models in our sketching interface and created daylight renderings provides significant insight into future features and improvements for OASIS. My contributions include the development of OASIS, the conduction of a pilot user study, and the analysis of results from that study.
dc.description.abstractDaylighting plays a significant role in architecture. Daylight's creative and efficient use offers aesthetic visuals, increased productivity, and reduced energy demand. However, daylight can also have adverse effects such as visual discomfort, solar heat gain, and an absence of energy savings. As a result, architects turn to daylight analysis to predict daylight's effects on architectural spaces. However, there are several challenges in daylight analysis that make prediction non-trivial and time intensive. Specifically, there are numerous factors to consider when visualizing daylight in an interior space. Daylight can vary depending on the season, the time of day, the cardinal direction of windows, the geographic location , the spatial geometry, and the reflectance of materials. Traditional approaches to daylight analysis require either the construction of physical scale model or development of virtual 3D models. Both methods are time intensive and can cause delays in the fast-paced early design phase of architecture.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectComputer science
dc.titleOnline architectural sketching interface for simulations
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177256
dc.digitool.pid177257
dc.digitool.pid177258
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Computer Science


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