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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorCentury, Michael
dc.contributorBahn, Curtis
dc.contributorOliveros, Pauline, 1932-
dc.contributorCox, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ryan Ross
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:38:35Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:38:35Z
dc.date.created2016-09-27T14:06:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1738
dc.descriptionAugust 2016
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractThis representational directness results in part from the distillation of notational information to what is often a small collection of graphic notational elements and their respective dynamic functionalities. Although these elements appear to emerge from the visual aesthetics of 20th century graphic notational practices, when combined with their dynamic functionalities they demonstrate a prescriptive specificity that reflect the prescriptive capacities of common practice notation [CPN]. However, the directness of AMN does not require one to understand an extensive symbol system like that of CPN in order to successfully engage; again, the performer is simply provided real-time instructions as to what to do and when to do it, and often on momentary, event by event basis. This directness, and the ephemerality of the score itself, require the notation to be immediately accessible to the performer. Thus, the animated score leads to a diminishment of the amateur-professional divide commonly associated with the Western musical tradition, specifically regarding the requirements that one gain a thorough understanding of CPN, including how to interpret these marks both technically and aesthetically.
dc.description.abstractWithin the history of Western music notational practices, the dynamic qualities found in Contemporary Animated Scoring Practices demonstrate a significant departure from tradition, and this dissertation seeks to develop new understandings of these practices from two complementary angles. First, I develop a low-level terminology for analysis of the symbols and dynamic behaviors commonly found in animated scores produced over the past 15 years. This practical groundwork is complemented by a theoretical account comprising three key ideas: the capacity these notational practices have for specific prescription, their tendency to disrupt traditional interpretive models, and the potential for animated scores to enable a post-literate representational model. Examples drawn from my body of artistic work are interspersed throughout the dissertation in order to highlight the various qualities of this practical and theoretical framework, and to track how my compositional and notational processes and intentions have progressed. In closing, I suggest areas for technological and artistic expansion, and propose a speculative codification of the field in its present state of development.
dc.description.abstractAnimated Music Notation [AMN] describes any notational approach that is represented in real time as a necessarily dynamic set of notational symbols that rely on the functional relationships between these symbols to prescribe musical actions. An Animated Score is any score that contains AMN as a necessary component to its proper representation.
dc.description.abstractBefore the emergence of contemporary animated scoring practices, the score existed primarily as a fixed, tangible object, with few exceptions to the contrary. With the inclusion of perceptible movement, including the real-time generation of notational information in some cases, the concept of the score as a static point of reference for one’s personal interpretation is largely dismantled. In many cases, the performer’s traditionally-held interpretive capacity is displaced, as this interpretive authority is transferred to the computational processes of the score. The performer’s interpretive capacity is further limited by the representational directness demonstrated by AMN functionalities, and the limited temporal window within which these functionalities are perceptible. In short, an animated score will often indicate little more than what to do and when to do it, and provide the performer with little leeway to do otherwise.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectElectronic arts
dc.titleA practical and theoretical framework for understanding contemporary animated scoring practices
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177439
dc.digitool.pid177440
dc.digitool.pid177441
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of the Arts


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