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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorHahn, Mariah
dc.contributorCramer, Steven M.
dc.contributorKarande, Pankaj
dc.contributorKoffas, Mattheos A. G.
dc.contributor.authorGharat, Tanmay Pradip
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:38:45Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:38:45Z
dc.date.created2016-09-27T14:06:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1742
dc.descriptionAugust 2016
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractIn the proposed work, we fabricated bioactive scaffolds in combination with stem cells and growth factors. Towards this goal, we made use tunable polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA)-based scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were encapsulated in PEGDA-based scaffolds in separate studies. Initially, bone marrow-derived MSCs were encapsulated in PEGDA-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffolds along with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) for specific osteoblastic differentiation. Low dosage levels of BMP-2 appeared to significantly enhance PEG-PDMS osteoinductivity. Subsequently, in the following study, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) was incorporated in PEGDA-chondroitin sulfate (CSC) scaffolds for driving chondrocytic differentiation of synovium-derived MSCs (SMSCs). In addition, intermediate levels of TGF-β1, PDMS and BMP-2 appeared to induce mix ‘cartilage/bone’ cell behavior in SMSCs. Overall, SMSCs appeared to be spatially guided for layer-specific differentiation depending on the initial biochemical composition of PEGDA scaffolds. In addition, the second study also established SMSCs as a viable MSC alternative for osteochondral repair.
dc.description.abstractAs a whole, the current work adds to the existing knowledge of stem cell—based therapies that are emerging as potential strategies for treating musculoskeletal conditions. The understanding from this work will take us one step forward in the rational development of promising scaffolds to treat the affected patients.
dc.description.abstractHuman ESCs (hESCs) were investigated for directed osteoblastic differentiation using step-wise differentiation involving an intermediate mesodermal lineage. Enhancement of FOXD3 expression in transfected hESCs using doxycycline (DOX) treatment followed by 3D osteogenic culture appeared to downregulate pluripotency levels and increase mesodermal commitment. Moreover, 48h of initial DOX treatment in 2D culture appeared to significantly upregulate osteoblastic marker expression suggesting directed differentiation.
dc.description.abstractMusculoskeletal diseases are becoming one of the major concerns in the US due the aging population, increasing cases of congenital defects, and trauma-related incidents. Drug therapies and exercise could provide temporary relief but do not heal the injured tissue. Surgical treatments and autologous grafts are common strategies used to treat these defects; however, they are inefficient at restoring full tissue function. The current study aims at providing potential stem cell-based tissue engineering strategies that could be used for osteochondral and skeletal repair.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectChemical engineering
dc.titleStem cell-based scaffolds for orthopedic applications
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177451
dc.digitool.pid177452
dc.digitool.pid177453
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering


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