Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorLewis, Kim M.
dc.contributorWang, G.-C. (Gwo-Ching), 1946-
dc.contributorTerrones, H. (Humberto)
dc.contributorDinolfo, Peter
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Qi
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:43:34Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:43:34Z
dc.date.created2017-01-13T09:51:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1842
dc.descriptionDecember 2016
dc.descriptionSchool of Science
dc.description.abstractThe molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet–visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The con-ductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis over a large set of measurements.
dc.description.abstractThe second factor studied, that is, the deprotection of the porphyrin end groups (acetylthio, -SCOCH₃), was completed in-situ for the free base porphyrin through the reaction of the acetylthio with sulfuric acid at 35° Celsius for 3 hours. MALDI spectros-copy confirms that two additional deprotected porphyrin species are formed by deprotection, with protonated (MH+) molecular masses of 721 and 679, corresponding to a partially deprotected porphyrin (i.e. only one of the two end groups deprotected), and a fully deprotected porphyrin molecule. Along with the un-reacted acetyl protected porphyrin, a total of 3 porphyrin species are in the solution. This solution is used for self-assembly on a gold/mica surface. The thickness of the in-situ deprotected SAM is determined to be ~1.7 nm, confirming a relatively upright molecular orientation (54.0°-63.5° between the substrate surface and the molecule), compared to a thickness of ~1.5 nm for the protected SAM that has a more flat-lying molecular orientation (~45.6° between the substrate surface and the molecule). From G-S measurements on SAMs prepared by in-situ deprotection, junctions with lower conductance steps at mid 10-5 G0 and junctions with higher conductance steps around 10-4 G0 are observed. Supported by computational modeling from our collaborating research group, we associate the lower conductance steps to junctions based on the protected form of thiols at the tip-molecule interface, and the higher conductance steps to the deprotected form of the thiol contacts. We suggest that the reduced conductance in the protected porphyrin originates from the presence of the acetyl end groups (-COCH₃), rather than from the elongation of the sulfur-gold (S-Au) bonds at the tip-molecule interface.
dc.description.abstractThe first factor studied, that is, the metal ion center in the porphyrin molecule, show that the conductance for iron (III) porphyrin (protected) is 3.74 ×10-5 G0, and the conductance for the free base porphyrin (protected) is 4.73×10-5 G0, where is the quantized unit of electrical conductance. Through our collaborative efforts, first principles calculations carried out by our collaborators for the molecular levels of an isolated molecule (without electrodes) show that the energy levels of an iron (III) porphyrin molecule are slightly shifted compared to that of the free base porphyrin. For the free base porphyrin, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level (-4.952 eV) lies between the chemical potentials of the substrate (-4.7 eV) and the STM tip (-5.1 eV). This level serves as a channel for electron transport. For the iron (III) porphyrin, the HOMO is at -5.306 eV, which is not in between the chemical potentials of the substrate. Therefore, a significantly smaller conductance is expected for the iron (III) porphyrin compared to the conductance of a free base porphyrin, because of the lack of the electron transport channel. However, the conductance measured from G-S experi-ments is comparable, i.e. 3.74 ×10-5 G0 for iron (III) porphyrin and 4.73×10-5 G0 for free base porphyrin. This suggests that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting may significantly affect the electron transport through molecular junctions.
dc.description.abstractBy studying these two factors, I expect this work to provide insights into electron transport through molecules or metal-molecule-metal junctions, and in applications related to integrating molecules as functional units in electronic devices.
dc.description.abstractFuture work related to this thesis may include the molecular conductance based on reduction-oxidation (redox) properties of iron ligated porphyrins for the application of molecular switches and molecular memory elements.
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I focus on two factors that would affect the electron transport through the porphyrin molecules, namely, the metal ion center, and the deprotection of the end groups. The effect of metal ion center is studied by comparing the conductance of an iron (III) porphyrin (protected) to that of a free base porphyrin (protected). The in-situ deprotection of the molecules before forming the junctions is completed to study the effect of the molecular-electrode interaction.
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protect-ed) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise under-standing of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectPhysics
dc.titleElectron transport through porphyrin molecular junctions
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177857
dc.digitool.pid177858
dc.digitool.pid177859
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record