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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorMackenzie, John D.
dc.contributor.authorNeely Jr., James E.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:44:51Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:44:51Z
dc.date.created2017-02-23T15:26:34Z
dc.date.issued1967-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1877
dc.descriptionMay 1967
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental purpose of this investigation has been to develop a conceptual understanding of the hardness of glass, especially fused silica. Up until now, hardness has been treated primarily from an empirical viewpoint, with the subsequent result that hardness has little physical significance. In order to formulate hardness into a useful material property it is first necessary to understand the physical process occurring during indentation.
dc.description.abstractWith this information, hardness of fused silica as determined by the Vickers Pyramid Indentor is defined as a resistance to densification.
dc.description.abstractFrom interference photographs of fracture-free, Vickers indentations made with a 1000 gram load, it was determined that an insignificant amount of fused silica is piled-up around the indentations. On this basis it is concluded that the mechanism of indentation of fused silica is densification. The nature of this densification has been investigated through annealing studies carried out on indentations. This suggested that a portion of the densification probably occurs by a reversible molecular entanglement mechanism. Material transport during indentation has been shown to occur primarily in a direction vertically downward into the specimen, rather than radially.
dc.description.abstractA critical review of the pertinent literature on hardness of glass has been included to point out some of the more serious errors which have been made and to indicate the background and current thinking of glass hardness
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMaterials engineering
dc.titleMicrohardness and flow mechanisms in fused silica
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177966
dc.digitool.pid177967
dc.digitool.pid177968
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Materials Engineering


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