Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorKrull, Robert, 1947-
dc.contributorBarnett, George A.
dc.contributorSteger, Joseph A.
dc.contributorMadden, Joseph M.
dc.contributor.authorKasperson, Conrad J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:44:59Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:44:59Z
dc.date.created2017-03-06T10:39:19Z
dc.date.issued1976-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1884
dc.descriptionDecember 1976
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractIt was concluded that scientists are information processors, and that creativity, as a mental process, can be explained by the information seeking behavior of the innovative scientist.
dc.description.abstractThis study focused on creativity among scientists and engineers. Based on prior research and a theory known as the "associationist position", scientists were viewed as information processors and an examination was made of the information sources used by a sample of practicing scientists and engineers.
dc.description.abstractResearch on creativity as a personality trait appears to have dubious merit due to the number and variety of traits studied and the suspect nature of many of the instruments which purport to measure individual creativity. Studies of the environment within which the individual functions conclude with the idea that the environment can inhibit creative behavior, but it cannot cause it to occur. The root of the problem is an apparent difficulty in defining just what creativity is.
dc.description.abstractEach hypothesis was evaluated using a two-way analysis of variance procedure. Results which are significant are: (1) There was no difference between groups in terms of published information sources except for periodicals of original research, where innovative scientists used the source more often and felt it had more utility. (2) People as a source of information were found to be used differently by the three groups. Innovative scientists use cues from other people to access published information more often than other groups -they seem to have and maintain a well-tuned network. Innovative scientists value people they meet at conventions and conferences more highly than other scientists again, the notion of a network, or "invisible college". The usefulness of superiors as an information source is considered more useful by non-innovative scientists than by other groups. This holds with earlier studies which found less creative people more impressed by "position power" . (3) The range of exposure by subject matter was greater for the innovative scientist, particularly for people as sources of information.
dc.description.abstractCreativity has been the subject of examination from numerous perspectives. These have ranged from creativity as a function of personality traits of the individual, as a situational outcome conditioned by the environment, and as a mental process.
dc.description.abstractIn addition, discriminant analysis was used to develop a predictive function which correctly placed almost 60% of the subjects into the correct production category by using only five variables, all of which dealt with people as information sources.
dc.description.abstractTo test these ideas, sixty-five scientists were interviewed from two separate organizations -- a university and an industrial laboratory. Each subject was evaluated by peers who, under a set of criteria, placed the scientist in one of three categories -- innovative and productive; productive, but not innovative; or non-innovative and non-productive. Data was then gathered from the subject concerning information seeking behavior and attitudes.
dc.description.abstractEleven hypotheses were constructed which proposed that creative, or innovative scientists found information more useful than less creative scientists, that it was used more frequently, that it took a wider variety of forms or channels, and that it contained more varied information in terms of subject matter.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectCommunication and rhetoric
dc.titleAn exploratory analysis of information use by innovative, productive, and non-productive scientists and engineers
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid177987
dc.digitool.pid177988
dc.digitool.pid177989
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Communication and Media


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record