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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorOdell, Garrett M.
dc.contributorBoyce, William E.
dc.contributorFlaherty, J. E., 1943-
dc.contributorJohnson, William H.
dc.contributor.authorMong, Christopher Chsiu
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:45:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:45:21Z
dc.date.created2017-04-13T16:31:21Z
dc.date.issued1976-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1896
dc.descriptionAugust 1976
dc.descriptionSchool of Science
dc.description.abstractBoth numerical and analytical asymptotic solutions are presented, using ranges of parameter values which are typical in epithelia. Some major conclusions yielded by the present study are: (i) the dependence of the emergent osmolarity upon channel length, channel radius at zero pressure gradient, active solute transport rate, osmotic permeability, diffusion rate and length of the region of active solute transport is qualitatively the same as the kinematic model; (ii) for fixed nonzero elasticity and water leakage rate, the emergent osmolarity is quantitatively different from that of the kinematic model, (iii) with a modest to large water leakage rate, the presence of elasticity tends to pull the emergent osmolarity towards isotonicity, (iv) the emergent osmolarity is more sensitive to changes in water leakage rate when channel is less flexible, (v) measurement of emergent osmolarity alone is not a sufficient characterization of the complete process of solute transport in the channel. Since all real tubules will leak to some extent, the compensatory effect of wall elasticity mentioned in (iii) and (iv) could be a physiologically important self-regulatory mechanism for any kind of fluid transport system in biological tubules.
dc.description.abstractThe movement of water and salt through a layer or layers of epithelial cells had been attributed to standing gradient flows along long narrow, extracellular channels that are common structural features of epithelial membranes in studies by Diamond and Tormey (1967). Mathematical models developed for such a system had been limited to channels with rigid walls while the water outflux due to the presence of hydrostatic pressure was ignored. To remedy such omissions, a hydrodynamic model is developed to describe the coupled water and solute flow in a long channel with elastic walls which is closed at one end and open at the other. The governing equations take into account the elasticity of the channel wall which is stretched by hydrostatic pressure and water leakage due to hydrostatic pressure difference between the interior and exterior o£ the channe1, at the same time retaining the one-dimensional properties used in the kinematic, model of Diamond and Bossert (1967) and Segel (1970).
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMathematics
dc.titleThe effects of hydrostatic pressure and wall elasticity on standing-gradient (osmotically driven) flow in physiological tubules
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid178021
dc.digitool.pid178023
dc.digitool.pid178024
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mathematical Sciences


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