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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorManners, George E., 1943-
dc.contributorHinrichs, John
dc.contributorSteger, Joseph A.
dc.contributorPaulson, A. S.
dc.contributor.authorOrne, Daniel Lee
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:45:47Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:45:47Z
dc.date.created2017-04-25T16:39:57Z
dc.date.issued1976-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1902
dc.descriptionMay 1976
dc.descriptionSchool of Management and Technology
dc.description.abstractThe historical utility of the alternative tenure criteria and predictors was considered by examining approximately 90 studies on employee job termination. It was concluded that the manner, in which the tenure criterion was specified, influenced the significance of the predictor - criterion relationship. The most predictable tenure criterion seemed to be a discrete exhaustive criterion with a common hire period for the subjects. Also, it was found that the following predictors have had consistently significant predictor - criterion relationships: interest tests; biographical variables, and job satisfaction scales. Conversely, intelligence tests, aptitude tests and personality tests were not consistently related to job termination.
dc.description.abstractIn attempting to predict the employees job termination, two suppositions about the prediction of job termination were developed. First, moderating the termination criterion is extremely effective if it increases the homogeneity within the criterion groups and makes the sizes of the criterion groups more equal. Second, it is important to cross-validate multivariate prediction results.
dc.description.abstractThe second objective of the termination study was to successfully predict the job termination of the employees. Discriminant analysis and factor scores were used to successfully predict a performance moderated criterion. In both validation and cross-validation samples, approximately 85% of the employees who were actually active were predicted to be active and approximately 50% of the employees who actually terminated were predicted to terminate.
dc.description.abstractThe empirical study had two objectives. The first was to identify and compare individual variables which were related to job tenure. Bivariate relationships between job termination and a wide variety of biographical characteristics, individual expressions, and situ~tional characteristics were closely examined. The results of that examination generally reinforced the previous conclusions about the utility of specific predictors. It was also concluded that there was a significant relationship between job tenure and (a) the employee's career goals and career expectations and (b) measures of the organization's satisfaction with the employee (i.e. job performance ratings). In addition, the predictor - criterion relationships of the new employees did not appear to be substantially different from that of experienced employees.
dc.description.abstractThe predictability of job termination was also considered from an empirical perspective by examining the job tenure of 2154 highly educated, technically oriented employees. These employees were hired in 1965 by a large American company. During the next five years, an attempt was made by the company to chronologically record a potential 650 pieces of information associated with each employee. A substantial proportion of the information was recorded.
dc.description.abstractThe theoretical utility of alternative prediction methodologies was briefly examined. It was concluded that the relative utility of a specific prediction methodology was dependent on the manner in which the criterion was specified and on the measurement scale of the predictors. A modified weighted application blank approach seemed best if there was a large number of nominally valued predictors and the criterion had two groups. The regression approach was best if the criterion was continuous. Discriminant analysis seemed best if the predictors roughly followed a multivariate normal distribution and there were more than two distinct criterion groups. For other combinations of the criterion and predictors, the relative utility of the prediction methodologies was not clear.
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this research was on the prediction of employee job termination. Historical, theoretical, and empirical perspectives were used to examine the influence of alternative tenure criteria, predictors, and prediction methodologies, on the predictability of job termination.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectManagement
dc.titleThe predictability of job termination
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid178050
dc.digitool.pid178051
dc.digitool.pid178052
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Management and Technology


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