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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorLin, Shawn-Yu
dc.contributorYamaguchi, Masashi
dc.contributorWang, G.-C. (Gwo-Ching), 1946-
dc.contributorWetzel, Christian
dc.contributorBhat, Ishwara B.
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Brian James
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:49:59Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:49:59Z
dc.date.created2017-07-03T14:33:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/1975
dc.descriptionMay 2017
dc.descriptionSchool of Science
dc.description.abstractIn this work, a TiO₂ simple cubic PC with high dielectric contrast ( > 4:1) is fabricated with a lattice constant of 450 nm, and a newly discovered light-trapping mechanism is demonstrated, which bends light by 90 degrees and enhances optical absorption by one to two orders-of-magnitude over that in a reference film of the same thickness. It is shown that, for wavelengths from 450-950 nm, the achievable enhancement factor for this structure surpasses the theoretical limit of 4n₂ derived under the assumption of ergodic system by multiple times. These results derive directly from the symmetry of the simple cubic lattice and are fundamental in nature, not depending on the material used or on the method of fabrication. The light trapping capability of these PCs has straight-forward applications that would be useful in a variety of areas where increased light-matter interaction is desirable, such as white-light generation, thin-film solar cells, photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen fuel production, and chemical sensing.
dc.description.abstractFor much of Earth’s history, light was reputed to be an intangible, intractable, and transient quantity, but our understanding of light has since been revolutionized. The flow of electromagnetic energy through space can today be manipulated with a degree of precision and control once only dreamed of; rapidly developing technologies can create, guide, bend, and detect light to produce useful energy and information. One field where these technologies are most relevant is the field of light trapping, which concerns the harvesting of incident photons within a limited space by scattering, slowing, or otherwise prolonging and enhancing their interaction with matter. Over the past few decades, a class of materials, called photonic crystals (PCs), has emerged that is ideally suited for this task. This is because their wavelength-scale periodicity in one, two, or three dimensions can be designed to alter the dispersion relation and photonic density-of-states in a controllable manner.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectPhysics
dc.titleOptical characterization of light-bending mechanisms in photonic crystals with simple cubic symmetry
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid178276
dc.digitool.pid178277
dc.digitool.pid178278
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy


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