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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorStoloff, N. S.
dc.contributorAnsell, George S.
dc.contributorDoremus, R. H.
dc.contributorDuquette, David J.
dc.contributorSolomon, Harvey D.
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kyung Sub
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:51:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:51:21Z
dc.date.created2017-07-27T09:53:22Z
dc.date.issued1976-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2011
dc.descriptionDecember 1976
dc.descriptionSchool of Materials Engineering
dc.description.abstractS-N data obtained from stress-controlled fatigue tests revealed a pronounced improvement in fatigue life for hydrided vanadium, but little or no effect for 132 ppm hydrogen in solution. Similarly, strain-control tests showed no effects of hydrogen in solution on either cyclic hardening for fatigue life, in marked contrast to decrease in low cycle life for vanadium containing hydride plates.
dc.description.abstractAdditional tests run as a function of oxygen content in low hydrogen alloys show that varying oxygen levels cannot account for observed changes in properties with hydrogen.
dc.description.abstractTransmission microscopy has been utilized to demonstrate differences in fatigue substructures obtained with hydrogen content. Dislocation cell structures formed in vanadium change to planar arrays of dislocations in the V-lOOO ppm hydrogen alloy. This behavior also has been related to changes in the cyclic strain hardening coefficient.
dc.description.abstractMetallographic and fractographic examinations show that fatigue cracks in vanadium start at slip bands and then grow in the stage II mode, resulting in striations on fracture surfaces. Hydrided vanadium shows cleavage fracture originating at brittle hydride plates. Cracks follow transgranular paths in most conditions. An increase in test temperature to 400°C changes fracture mode from cleavage to striated fracture for the V-lOOO ppm hydrogen alloy. Hydride plates in the cross section-of fatigue samples may suggest stress induced hydrides.
dc.description.abstractThe fatigue behavior of unalloyed 99.8% vanadium and three vanadium-hydrogen alloys, 132, 400 and 1000 ppm hydrogen, were determined in both stress control and strain control at room temperature. In addition, stress-control tests were conducted on vanadium and the 1000 ppm hydrogen alloy at 400°c and 600°C in air.
dc.description.abstractHigh cycle fatigue tests on vanadium and the V-IOOO ppm hydrogen alloy at room temperature as a function of test frequency showed a significant decrease in life for decreasing frequency for the alloy, but little effect for vanadium. These results furnish an explanation of anomolies between fatigue lives obtained in stress and strain control tests, respectively. The increase of high cycle fatigue life of hydrided vanadium has been related to slip dispersal by hydride plates and to a decrease in the cyclic strain hardening coefficient, n.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMaterials engineering
dc.titleFatigue of vanadium-hydrogen alloys
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid178442
dc.digitool.pid178443
dc.digitool.pid178444
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Engineering


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