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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorScarton, Henry A.
dc.contributorManiatty, Antoinette M.
dc.contributorBlanchet, Thierry A.
dc.contributor.authorLitman, Robert B.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T08:52:06Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T08:52:06Z
dc.date.created2017-11-10T12:33:54Z
dc.date.issued2015-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2031
dc.descriptionAugust 2015
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractChannels that extend axially along a length of pipe were simulated extensively using frequency-domain finite element analysis. Channels using a wedge shaped intermediary between the transducers and the pipe wall were the focus as prior research indicated that wedges improve channel efficiency. Numerous conclusions were drawn including that maximum channel efficiency increases as the intermediary wedges get shallower (incident angle increases towards 90 degrees) and excitation frequency increases.
dc.description.abstractFinally, the problem of delamination of transducers from their steel substrates due to unequal thermal expansion was examined. Multiple epoxy adhesives were tested including one that maintained integrity at temperatures up to 150 degrees Celsius. Use of transition plates between the transducers and the steel substrates with intermediate coefficients of thermal expansion was also considered. Nickel-iron alloys kovar and invar proved to be effective at reducing the interfacial stresses that cause delamination while only slightly reducing acoustic performance.
dc.description.abstractA second research aim was probing the feasibility and behavior of “acoustic fiber”, the acoustic analogue to optical fiber. Again, frequency-domain FEA was employed. Heuristics governing the relationships between efficiency, physical dimensions, and frequency were produced.
dc.description.abstractA system for remote sensing of sealed or inaccessible environments has been developed which relies on acoustic waves for power transfer and communication. Acoustic waves are sent into a physical structure from the accessible side and harvested on the inaccessible side. The energy harvested is used to power a sensor and communications circuitry which sends the sensor reading back to the accessible side encoded in acoustic waves.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMechanical engineering
dc.titleWaveguides for acoustic power and communication channels
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid178502
dc.digitool.pid178503
dc.digitool.pid178504
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering


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