Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorOehlschlaeger, Matthew A.
dc.contributorAnderson, Kurt S.
dc.contributorOehlschlaeger, Matthew A.
dc.contributorBorca-Tasçiuc, Theodorian
dc.contributor.authorPawlak, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T09:02:03Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T09:02:03Z
dc.date.created2018-07-27T15:39:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2241
dc.descriptionMay 2018
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractSurfaces exhibiting hydrophobic characteristics are significant in both industrial and consumer applications. Considerable effort has gone into studying the hydrophobic properties of chemical coatings, nano and small machined structures, and naturally occurring surfaces. This study will test various simple textured aluminum surfaces that are easily reproducible and mechanically durable in order to determine the hydrophobicity of each surface. The relationships between contact angle and sliding angle, as well as surface roughness and contact angle hysteresis will also be examined. Six different surfaces were prepared, including a control surface, three surfaces of differing roughness, and two machined surfaces. The contact angle, sliding angle, and contact hystereses of the samples were analyzed, and the results were summarized and explained based on past research into drop-surface interaction. The highest contact angles measured were on the machined surfaces, with the control and abraded surfaces all exhibiting hydrophilic properties with the exception of one abraded surface. The data supports the notion that surface roughness does not strictly correlate with contact angle, as it is possible to roughen a surface in ways that increase contact angle.
dc.description.abstractThe data also suggests that contact angle does not always correlate with sliding angle but surface roughness does correlate with sliding angle. The three roughest surfaces used in this experiment caused water drops to adhere to them so strongly that drops would not slide off of the surface, even when the surface was elevated to a completely vertical position. Lastly, drops placed on surfaces with large machined features (0.01”) were observed transitioning from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state, suggesting that these features are too large or rough to allow the drops to remain in the Cassie-Baxter state for extended periods of time.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectMechanical engineering
dc.titleHydrophobicity of textured aluminum surfaces
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid179128
dc.digitool.pid179129
dc.digitool.pid179130
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record