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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorHahn, Tomie
dc.contributorCentury, Michael
dc.contributorRouse, Rebecca
dc.contributorScheib, Jay
dc.contributor.authorO'Hare, Matth
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T09:05:33Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T09:05:33Z
dc.date.created2018-10-24T13:41:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2292
dc.descriptionAugust 2018
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractThe applications for digital media in contemporary theatre practice commonly fail to support the presence of the performer as defined by foundational actor-training techniques. This dissertation articulates the impediments and outlines strategies for the successful integration of interactive technology. The presence of the actor depends on her freedom to engage in extemporaneous and interdependent action or dialogue. I propose The Points of Contact as actor- focused strategies for the design of sensor-based interactive environments capable of dialogical exchange. Performance spaces designed according to these strategies support the presence of the actor by engendering meaningful dialogue between the human performer and autonomous digital media.
dc.description.abstractUltimately, my dissertation research is driven by the hypothesis that interactive technology demonstrates new utility within the theatre arts if it adheres to the foremost principles of acting techniques that have come to define Western theatre tradition. In addition to providing theatre designers a means of collaborating more closely with performers through the use of interactive media, my intention is to further encourage theatre's relevance as an art form by engaging with increasingly ubiquitous sensor-based technologies and contributing to the development of novel acting techniques that leverage the expressive potential of new media. Finally, as a holistic art where social issues often play out in real time, theatre is repeatedly a point of reference for many fields of scientific inquiry concerning human behavior. Accordingly, I view my Points of Contact framework as having use in areas of study pertaining to the relationship of technological systems to cognitive and social functioning including human- computer interaction, robotics and artificial intelligence, and algorithmic art and creativity.
dc.description.abstractResearch draws primarily from the teachings of seminal theatre artists including Konstantin Stanislavsky, Antonin Artaud, Bertolt Brecht, Sanford Meisner, and Jerzy Grotowski; widely recognized contemporary theatre artists and scholars including Anne Bogart, Richard Schechner, and Richard Maxwell; and leading practitioners of human-computer interaction in the digital arts including Myron Krueger, Brenda Laurel, and David Z. Saltz. In support of my literary research, I draw extensively from my firsthand experiences training in physical theatre at Double Edge in Ashfield, Massachusetts, at The Grotowski Institute in Wroclaw, Poland, and my time learning Meisner Technique at Boston College as an undergraduate student.
dc.description.abstractCrucial to my research is the direct application of the Points of Contact framework within my artistic practice as a performer and a designer of interactive environments. In the final chapter that details the Points of Contact, I relate my experiences applying the system to two of my own theatre works entitled “blastbeats” (2017) and “Pentagram Walk” (2017), which utilize voice-analysis and motion-tracking, respectively. I detail my own challenges designing interactive systems and performing within them to offer illustrative examples and bridge theory with practice.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectElectronic arts
dc.titlePoints of contact : an actor-centered approach for the design of interactive environments for theatre performance
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid179325
dc.digitool.pid179329
dc.digitool.pid179328
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of the Arts


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