Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorTsamis, Alexandros
dc.contributorLokko, Mae-ling Jovenes
dc.contributorCrembil, Gustavo
dc.contributor.authorRidwana, Iffat
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T09:10:55Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T09:10:55Z
dc.date.created2020-05-01T13:01:47Z
dc.date.issued2019-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2425
dc.descriptionAugust 2019
dc.descriptionSchool of Architecture
dc.description.abstractIn this study, (i) a comprehensive literature review framework is used to investigate the compositional variety of organic food and agricultural wastes for mycelium bio-composite production, (ii) mechanical tests on mycelium-organic waste bio-composite boards are performed based on ASTM Standard D-1037, to determine optimum ratios of food waste to mycelium and processing conditions in relation to commercially available mycelium products, (iii) design strategies for maximizing microclimatic conditions and passive energy flows to support the production of mycelium bio-composites are explored, and finally (iv) the interior conditions of design integration within the case study building are investigated using Energy Plus simulation software. This integrated design research is significant to establish a framework for mycelium- organic waste bio-composites production that can be adapted within comparative informal settlement contexts across the hot humid region.
dc.description.abstractAs a result of population growth, constant rural to urban migration, lack of affordable housing and economic vulnerability, the growth of informal settlements is rapidly increasing, particularly in developing countries along the hot humid climate zone. Concurrently, the amount of solid waste generated, inefficient waste management and lack of necessary waste transformation in this region are affecting the people and the environment adversely. This thesis proposes the informal settlements as potential urban centers to develop a waste-to-resource based production system through the integration of emerging bio-based mycelium technologies that leverages widely available organic waste as a raw material for production in a case study area of Dhaka, Bangladesh. The research evaluates the available resource of organic waste and proposes an alternative paradigm of low-energy, low-tech and decentralized manufacturing process of mycelium biocomposites integrated into informal settlements.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.titleDesign integration of mycelium biocomposites production using organic waste in informal settlements
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid179741
dc.digitool.pid179742
dc.digitool.pid179743
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentSchool of Architecture


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record