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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorStaniszewski, Mary Anne
dc.contributorRuiz, Kathleen
dc.contributorMiller, Branda
dc.contributorMalazita, James
dc.contributorKielwagen, Jefferson
dc.contributorKellhammer, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T09:24:07Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T09:24:07Z
dc.date.created2021-07-07T16:13:35Z
dc.date.issued2020-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/2665
dc.descriptionDecember 2020
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractPeregrination can refer to a metaphor for the course of a person’s life, a spiritual pilgrimage, the physical act of travel, an account of a journey, and even a scholarly study. My dissertation is a peregrination of peregrinations; it is a multipronged study of what I call “ambulatory writing,” composed of an analytical text and three projects. Ambulatory writing is a term I use to describe a historical yet emergent mode of socially engaged communication that is characterized by what I see as the creative blending of walking and writing—a generative transdisciplinary formation. I contend that “ambulatory writers” (artists, activists, and social movements) spur the development of this formation by metaphorically or poetically expanding their conceptualizations of walking and writing. The fusion of the two acts is not accidental; it is done for tactical purposes, allowing for a specific idea or feeling to be communicated in a more embodied, evocative, and comprehensible way. Such poeticization has an illustrative function, but also a constitutive function in that it promotes shifts in thinking, which can lead to new ideas and even new ways of being in the world.
dc.description.abstractMy peregrination of ambulatory writing begins by briefly exploring expanded conceptualizations of walking and writing, followed by a select historical survey of practices and projects that I frame as ambulatory writing, followed by a discussion of three of my recent works that are representative of my ambulatory writing practice. The three works are 1) Crossing Illinois for Housing (2019), my approximately 175-mile week-long walk across Illinois to raise funds and awareness for people experiencing homelessness in the state; 2) coyote travelog (2020), my three-year long writing project composed of text from the streets and spaces of New York City; and 3) a walking-based course I have designed called “Asking, We Walk,” which is intended to build spatial/placial consciousness and militancy through a combination of walking, writing, and engaged discussion. Seeing as this is a practice-based dissertation, in the Appendix, I present photographs and press links pertaining to my project Crossing Illinois for Housing; the full-version of coyote travelog; and my emergent curriculum, “Asking, We Walk.”
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectElectronic arts
dc.titleOn peregrinations : a history and practice of ambulatory writing
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid180491
dc.digitool.pid180492
dc.digitool.pid180494
dc.digitool.pid180493
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of the Arts


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