Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSuflita, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorFu, Li
dc.contributor.authorHe, Wenqin
dc.contributor.authorKoffas, Mattheos
dc.contributor.authorLinhardt, Robert J.
dc.date2015
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-23T04:20:08Z
dc.date.available2022-06-23T04:20:08Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-22
dc.identifier.citationHeparin and related polysaccharides: Synthesis using recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering, M. Suflita, L. Fu, W. He, M. Koffas, R. J. Linhardt, Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 99, 7465–7479, 2015.
dc.identifier.issn14320614
dc.identifier.issn1757598
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/5353
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-015-6821-9
dc.descriptionApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 99, 7465–7479
dc.descriptionNote : if this item contains full text it may be a preprint, author manuscript, or a Gold OA copy that permits redistribution with a license such as CC BY. The final version is available through the publisher’s platform.
dc.description.abstractGlycosaminoglycans are linear anionic polysaccharides that exhibit a number of important biological and pharmacological activities. The two most prominent members of this class of polysaccharides are heparin/heparan sulfate and the chondroitin sulfates (including dermatan sulfate). These polysaccharides, having complex structures and polydispersity, are biosynthesized in the Golgi of most animal cells. The chemical synthesis of these glycosaminoglycans is precluded by their structural complexity. Today, we depend on food animal tissues for their isolation and commercial production. Ton quantities of these glycosaminoglycans are used annually as pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. The variability of animal-sourced glycosaminoglycans, their inherent impurities, the limited availability of source tissues, the poor control of these source materials, and their manufacturing processes, suggest a need for new approaches for their production. Over the past decade there have been major efforts in the biotechnological production of these glycosaminoglycans. This mini-review focuses on the use of recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering for the production of heparin and chondroitin sulfates.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation
dc.languageen_US
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofThe Linhardt Research Labs Online Collection
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology
dc.relation.urihttps://harc.rpi.edu/
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectChemistry and chemical biology
dc.subjectChemical and biological engineering
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.titleHeparin and related polysaccharides: Synthesis using recombinant enzymes and metabolic engineering
dc.typeArticle
dcterms.accessRightsA full text version is available in DSpace@RPI
dcterms.isPartOfJournal
dcterms.isVersionOfhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-015-6821-9
dc.rights.holderIn Copyright : this Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s). https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/
dc.creator.identifierhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2219-5833
dc.relation.departmentThe Linhardt Research Labs.
dc.relation.departmentThe Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS)
rpi.description.pages7465-7479
rpi.description.volume99


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record