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dc.contributor.authorMora-Pale, Mauricio
dc.contributor.authorSanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P.
dc.contributor.authorLinhardt, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorDordick, Jonathan S.
dc.contributor.authorKoffas, Mattheos A.G.
dc.date2014
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-27T16:06:07Z
dc.date.available2022-06-27T16:06:07Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-01
dc.identifier.citationBiochemical strategies for enhancing the in vivo production of natural products with pharmaceutical potential, M. Mora-Pale, S.P. Sanchez-Rodriguez, R. J. Linhardt, J. S. Dordick, M. Koffas, Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 25, 86–94, 2014.
dc.identifier.issn18790429
dc.identifier.issn9581669
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.009
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/5699
dc.descriptionCurrent Opinion in Biotechnology, 25, 86–94
dc.descriptionNote : if this item contains full text it may be a preprint, author manuscript, or a Gold OA copy that permits redistribution with a license such as CC BY. The final version is available through the publisher’s platform.
dc.description.abstractNatural products have been associated with significant health benefits in preventing and treating various chronic human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and pathogenic infections. However, the isolation, characterization and evaluation of natural products remain a challenge, mainly due to their limited bioavailability. Metabolic engineering and fermentation technology have emerged as alternative approaches for generating natural products under controlled conditions that can be optimized to maximize yields. Optimization of these processes includes the evaluation of factors such as host selection, product biosynthesis interaction with the cell's central metabolism, product degradation, and byproduct formation. This review summarizes the most recent biochemical strategies and advances in expanding and diversifying natural compounds as well as maximizing their production in microbial and plants cells.
dc.description.urihttps://login.libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.009
dc.languageen_US
dc.language.isoENG
dc.relation.ispartofThe Linhardt Research Labs Online Collection
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Biotechnology
dc.relation.urihttps://harc.rpi.edu/
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectChemistry and chemical biology
dc.subjectChemical and biological engineering
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.titleBiochemical strategies for enhancing the in vivo production of natural products with pharmaceutical potential
dc.typeArticle
dcterms.accessRightshttps://login.libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.009
dcterms.isPartOfJournal
dcterms.isVersionOfhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.009
dc.rights.holderIn Copyright : this Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s). https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/
dc.creator.identifierhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2219-5833
dc.relation.departmentThe Linhardt Research Labs.
dc.relation.departmentThe Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS)
rpi.description.pages86-94
rpi.description.volume25


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