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dc.contributor.authorLinhardt, Robert J.
dc.contributor.authorToida, Toshihiko
dc.date2002
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-27T16:18:37Z
dc.date.available2022-06-27T16:18:37Z
dc.date.issued2002-11-15
dc.identifier.citationUltra-High Resolution Separation Comes of Age, R.J. Linhardt, T. Toida, Science, 298, 1141-1142, 2002.
dc.identifier.issn368075
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1126/science.298.5597.1441
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/5819
dc.descriptionScience, 298, 1141-1142
dc.descriptionNote : if this item contains full text it may be a preprint, author manuscript, or a Gold OA copy that permits redistribution with a license such as CC BY. The final version is available through the publisher’s platform.
dc.description.abstractBorn in the late 1960s (1), popularized in its infancy for its high resolution (2), and reaching puberty in the mid 1980s with the introduction of commercial instrumentation (3), capillary electrophoresis (CE) has finally entered adulthood as a reliable and widely useful analytical technology. In 1937, Nobel Prize-winner Arne Tiselius first described electrophoresis, a method for separating charged molecules in an externally applied electric field. With the introduction of agarose and polyacrylamide gels, electrophoresis evolved as the principal means of high-resolution biopolymer (e.g., DNA, protein, and glycan) analysis. Gel electrophoresis, however, remains a qualitative, time-consuming, and labor-intensive analytical method. As we enter the new millennium, we have begun to realize the potential of CE for the automated and rapid analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and high sensitivity.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
dc.description.urihttps://login.libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1126/science.298.5597.1441
dc.languageen_US
dc.language.isoENG
dc.relation.ispartofThe Linhardt Research Labs Online Collection
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofScience
dc.relation.urihttps://harc.rpi.edu/
dc.subjectBiology
dc.subjectChemistry and chemical biology
dc.subjectChemical and biological engineering
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.titleUltra-High Resolution Separation Comes of Age
dc.typeArticle
dcterms.accessRightshttps://login.libproxy.rpi.edu/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1126/science.298.5597.1441
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dcterms.isVersionOfhttps://doi.org/10.1126/science.298.5597.1441
dc.rights.holderIn Copyright : this Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s). https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/
dc.creator.identifierhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2219-5833
dc.relation.departmentThe Linhardt Research Labs.
dc.relation.departmentThe Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS)
rpi.description.pages1441-1442
rpi.description.volume298


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