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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students in accordance with the Rensselaer Standard license. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorShelley, Jacob T., 1984-
dc.contributorMattson, Neil
dc.contributorLetchford, C. W.
dc.contributorKilduff, James
dc.contributor.advisorNyman, Marianne
dc.contributor.authorAshenafi, Eyosias L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-15T22:10:21Z
dc.date.available2022-09-15T22:10:21Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/6210
dc.descriptionMay 2022
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractControlled environment agriculture (CEA) is a rapidly growing production system that promotes food security, environmental stewardship, and efficient resource use. According to a recent report, global market for CEA is projected to grow at an 18.7 % annual rate and reach $172 billion in 2025. In this work, the agricultural output (crop yield and nutrient content) of three kale cultivars (‘Toscano’, ‘Redbor’, and ‘Winterbor’) grown in environmental chambers was compared with the output of identical varieties grown in the field and greenhouse systems. Differences in morphology and growth kinetics were observed between the different systems. Overall, higher phytochemical content was observed in plants from the growth chamber environment. At seedling stage, lutein concentration (macular pigment) in leaves from growth chamber was 37 – 72 % higher than lutein from other growth systems. In this study, cultivar type and developmental stage were also found to be important factors that determine nutritional quality in kale. Composition of light spectra is known to influence the morphology of plants and leaf phytochemicals. In the second study, the effect of different blue peak wavelength (400 – 450 nm) on kale development was investigated using tunable LED lamps inside CEA units. Pigment content was observed to be influenced by the type and irradiance level of blue spectrum during growth. Linear increase in lutein and chlorophyll a concentration was found as a function of blue peak wavelength. Finally, in the third study, a cost-effective spectrophotometric method for the quantification of pigments in leaf extracts was developed. Harnessing the spectral and physico-chemical properties of the principal light-absorbing compounds (chlorophylls and carotenoids) found in leafy greens, simultaneous equations were formulated and tested. Overall, the research findings will contribute to the adoption of CEA systems for growing nutritious crops.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectEnvironmental engineering
dc.titleOptimization of controlled environment agriculture (CEA) for growing crops
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2022-09-15T22:10:23Z
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.creator.identifierhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7077-5459
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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