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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorBaveye, P. (Philippe)
dc.contributorGorby, Yuri
dc.contributorKilduff, James
dc.contributor.authorFarris, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T07:58:39Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T07:58:39Z
dc.date.created2013-09-09T14:31:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/855
dc.descriptionMay 2013
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractExperimental results gave light on a number of artifacts and system design flaws including pressure drop measurements, uneven spread of microbes in the subsurface, and contamination of nutrient sources. Additionally, deviation of flow and preferential pathways were observed which could, if ignored at the field scale, have important ramifications.
dc.description.abstractWithin the study of soil science, there is a keen interest in understanding the impact that microorganisms have on subsurface water flow. Efforts at both the field scale and the laboratory scale have yielded thoughtful experiments and valuable data. However, to move forward in this area, it is important to understand the design limitations of the experiments and to avoid potential experimental artifacts at all costs.
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to visualize these artifacts and errors of interpretation that can result in the development of biocurtains in the field. The assumption underlying biocurtain development is that it is possible to stimulate growth of microorganisms enough to create a semipermeable barrier to filter and purify aquifer flow. Due to heterogeneities in the subsurface, this technology is difficult to implement. In addition to demonstrating potential artifacts, this project visualized the development of preferential pathways and diversionary flow that can occur in the field during the installation of biocurtains.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectEnvironmental engineering
dc.titleVisualization of artifacts in research on bioclogging of natural porous media
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid167076
dc.digitool.pid167080
dc.digitool.pid167081
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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