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dc.rights.licenseRestricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.
dc.contributorOehlschlaeger, Matthew A.
dc.contributorJensen, M. K.
dc.contributorRusak, Zvi
dc.contributorBequette, B. Wayne
dc.contributor.authorWang, Weijing
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T07:59:13Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T07:59:13Z
dc.date.created2013-09-09T14:43:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/873
dc.descriptionMay 2013
dc.descriptionSchool of Engineering
dc.description.abstractThe autoignition of biofuel compounds that offer potential as diesel fuel alternatives was studied under high-pressure engine-like conditions using the shock tube technique. Ignition delay times were determined in reflected shock experiments using measured pressure and electronically-excited OH emission. Measurements were made at conditions ranging from 650 to 1350 K, pressures from 6 to 50 atm, and for fuel/air/diluent mixtures at equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2. The wide range of temperatures examined provides observation of autoignition in three reactivity regimes, including the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) regime which is characteristic of fuels containing alkyl functionalities.
dc.description.abstractThis thesis work provides a rich database of kinetic information for biofuel-related compounds at conditions relevant to real engine operations, offering quantitative kinetic targets for the development and evaluation of future kinetic models for important alternative fuel compounds. The results quantify the reactivity variability of biodiesel alternatives and illustrate that at temperature greater than 900 to 1000 K fuel structure has little influence on reactivity, as fuel fragmentation results in an intermediate pool that is largely the same for the fuels studied. On the other hand at temperature lower than 900 K, where fuel-specific low-temperature chemistry plays a role, different fuel structures can result in vast differences in reactivity, up to factors of three or more in ignition delay.
dc.description.abstractMeasurements were compared to kinetic modeling results from models available in the literature providing varying degrees of model validation. Reaction flux analyses were also carried out to further examine the kinetic differences in different temperature regimes for fuel compounds. For example, reaction flux analyses illustrates the importance of the long alkyl chain in controlling the overall reactivity of methyl ester biodiesel compounds and the subtle role the ester group has on inhibiting low-temperature reactivity as well as the influence of branching on reactivity for lightly branched alkanes.
dc.description.abstractCompounds studied include biodiesel-related compounds and real biodiesel fuels, dimethyl ether, and 3-methylheptane which is representative of compounds found in synthetic diesel fuels produced using the Fischer-Tropsch and hydrotreatment processes. Biodiesel compounds studied include biodiesel surrogates, methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, and methyl-9-decenoate; compounds found in large quantities in biodiesels, methyl palmitate, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, and methyl linoleate; and soy-based and animal fat based methyl ester biodiesels. Comparison of biodiesel compounds illustrates the influence of molecular structure (e.g., chain length, double bonds, and ester functionality) on reactivity. For methyl decanoate, the effect of high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) conditions relevant to internal combustion engines was also determined. Results showed that the first-order influence of EGR by displacing fuel and O2 to decrease radical branching.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectAeronautical engineering
dc.titleAutoignition studies of diesel alternative biofuels
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid167127
dc.digitool.pid167128
dc.digitool.pid167129
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering


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