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dc.contributorHaskins, Ekaterina V., 1969-
dc.contributorLewis, Barbara J.
dc.contributorOdell, Lee, 1940-
dc.contributorZappen, James Philip
dc.contributorLindholm, Jeannette
dc.contributor.authorLitterio, Lisa M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-03T07:59:36Z
dc.date.available2021-11-03T07:59:36Z
dc.date.created2013-09-09T14:52:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.13015/885
dc.descriptionMay 2013
dc.descriptionSchool of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
dc.description.abstractThis research addresses the question, "What is the future of first-year composition within a multimodal, digital landscape?" through a study of the Digital Expository Writing (DEW) Program. DEW consisted of three sections of first-year composition that examined readings relating to current technologies and assignments that asked students to write, reflect on, and combine visual, audio, and media elements. Through observations of classroom sessions, student interactions, and faculty meetings along with student interviews, this study explores findings from two major assignments: the remix video and the final multimedia project. This study demonstrates how pedagogical practices that characterize multimodal composing are engaging and student-centered, and focused on experimentation and collaboration with technology and class discussions about media elements. With the remix project, students created collaborative communities to discuss technology, became immersed in the genre, and used free writing and talking out ideas with the instructor as a way to decide on their topic. In addition, their composing processes extended beyond classroom instruction, particularly with learning the technology required for these compositions and soliciting feedback from other audience members. However, the final project, discussed in Chapter Five, required students to address multiple goals, including field work, research, and exposition through several modalities, such as writing, media, and text. These demands overloaded students and left them struggling with the various tasks and the cohesion between these components. Finally, this study offers logistical, pedagogical, and technological considerations for instructors interested in transitioning to a multimodal, digital writing program.
dc.language.isoENG
dc.publisherRensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
dc.relation.ispartofRensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
dc.subjectCommunication and rhetoric
dc.titlePedagogies, processes, and possibilities : examining the future of first-year composition through the Digital Expository Writing (DEW) program
dc.typeElectronic thesis
dc.typeThesis
dc.digitool.pid167160
dc.digitool.pid167161
dc.digitool.pid167162
dc.rights.holderThis electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.relation.departmentDept. of Communication and Media


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