Wildland urban interface (WUI) building design and site considerations

Authors
Ward, Karen K.
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Other Contributors
Ngai, Ted
Crembil, Gustavo
Ghoche, Ralph
Issue Date
2014-05
Keywords
Architecture
Degree
MArch
Terms of Use
This electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
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Abstract
The spate of recent wildfire activity in the western United States (and significant property losses) has drawn attention to what ecologists have said for years about increasing temperatures and longer periods of drought: Greater frequency and intensity of record-setting wildfires correlates to decades of forestry mismanagement practice, unprecedented growth into the wildland urban interface (WUI), and increasing seasonal temperature due to climate change. With a holistic approach to landscape design and maintenance, material selection, and architectural design, we can reduce the vulnerability of structures in areas prone to drought and wildfire activity. Understanding wildfire behavior, use of heat-resistant materials, and application of "firewise" details are crucial to the design of fire-resistant communities. Architects, engineers, and urban planners are the decision-making agents who can revolutionize a radically new approach to WUI communities.
Description
May 2014
School of Architecture
Department
School of Architecture
Publisher
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
Relationships
Rensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
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