Terahertz-wave absorption gas sensing for dimethyl sulfoxide

Authors
Passarelli, Alec
ORCID
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3494-8492
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Other Contributors
Borca-Tasçiuc, Theodorian
Anderson, Kurt S.
Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.
Issue Date
2022-05
Keywords
Mechanical engineering
Degree
MS
Terms of Use
This electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
Full Citation
Abstract
Rotational absorption spectroscopy for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is characterized in the 220-330 GHz frequency range using a robust electronic THz-wave spectrometer, for the development of THz gas sensing for this compound of commercial relevance. DMSO is a common solvent used in many food, pharmaceutical, and manufacturing applications, and can present danger to human health and the work environment; hence, remote gas sensors for DMSO environmental and process monitoring are desired. Absorption measurements were carried out for pure DMSO at 297 K and 0.4 Torr. DMSO was shown to have a unique rotational fingerprint with series of repeating absorption features. The frequencies of transitions observed in the present study are found to be in good agreement with prior experimental work and spectral simulations based on rotational parameters. The sensor developed here exhibits a detection limit of 1.3-2.6 x 1015 DMSO molecules/cm3 per meter of absorption pathlength, with the potential for greater sensitivity with signal-to-noise improvements. The study illustrates the potential of all electronic THz-wave systems for miniaturized remote gas sensors
Description
May 2022
School of Engineering
Department
Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering
Publisher
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
Relationships
Rensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
Access
Restricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students in accordance with the Rensselaer Standard license. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.