Physicochemical properties and conformations of water-soluble peach gums via different preparation methods

Authors
Wei, Chaoyang
Zhang, Yu
Zhang, Hua
Li, Junhui
Tao, Wenyang
Linhardt, Robert J.
Chen, Shiguo
Ye, Xingqian
ORCID
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2219-5833
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Other Contributors
Issue Date
2019-10-01
Keywords
Biology , Chemistry and chemical biology , Chemical and biological engineering , Biomedical engineering
Degree
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Full Citation
Physicochemical properties and conformations of water-soluble peach gums via different preparation methods, C. Wei, Y. Zhang, H. Zhang, J. Li, W. Tao, R. J. Linhardt, S. Chen, X. Ye, Food Hydrocolloids, 95, 571-579, 2019.
Abstract
Physicochemical properties and conformations of WEPG (water extracted peach gum), AEPG2.0 (alkali extracted peach gum, 2 M NaOH) and HPPG8 (H2O2 extracted peach gum, 8 h), prepared from the gum of Prunus persica Batsch, were investigated. The yields of WEPG, AEPG2.0 and HPPG8 were 77.25%, 82.60% and 83.34%, respectively. All of the three peach gums were arabinogalactan-type polysaccharides with similar chemical composition. Conformational analysis revealed that WEPG, AEPG2.0 and HPPG8 were macromolecules with compacted coil structures and their molecular weights of 1.34 × 107 g/mol, 1.64 × 107 g/mol and 5.17 × 106 g/mol, respectively. Rheological test showed that WEPG, AEPG2.0 and HPPG8 exhibited non-Newtonian behavior, and their apparent viscosities followed the order of AEPG2.0 > WEPG > HPPG8. Results also indicated that all of the three peach gums significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the stability of whey protein isolate oil-water emulsions, and AEPG2.0 was the optimal gum extract showing no phase separation over 5 weeks, suggesting it could be used as an effective stabilizer in food emulsions and beverage industry.
Description
Food Hydrocolloids, 95, 571-579
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Department
The Linhardt Research Labs.
The Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS)
Publisher
Relationships
The Linhardt Research Labs Online Collection
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
Food Hydrocolloids
https://harc.rpi.edu/
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