Engineering Escherichia coli motility as a response to the esa quorum sensing system

Authors
Bower, Adam
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Other Contributors
Collins, Cynthia H.
Koffas, Mattheos A. G.
Julius, Anak Agung
Issue Date
2013-08
Keywords
Chemical and biological engineering
Degree
MS
Terms of Use
This electronic version is a licensed copy owned by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. Copyright of original work retained by author.
Full Citation
Abstract
The scale-down of robotic systems to micro scales creates challenges with respect to movement. Previously, biomimetic and organic actuators have been employed to move these structures. However, these systems are limited by construction technology and control. The coupling of microorganisms and microrobots to build microbiorobots (MBRs) offers advantages over the use of other actuators. Microorganisms can draw energy from the environment for propulsion and can be engineered with genetic logic for sensing external cues and motility. Previous research utilized the swimming capability of wild-type Serratia marcescens to move an MBR. The next tier of this platform is engineering bacterial motility as a response to environmental signals. This thesis work focused on the development and characterization of an Escherichia coli strain where motility has been engineered to turn on in response to cell to cell signals.
Description
August 2013
School of Engineering
Department
Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Publisher
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
Relationships
Rensselaer Theses and Dissertations Online Collection
Access
Restricted to current Rensselaer faculty, staff and students. Access inquiries may be directed to the Rensselaer Libraries.